29 Years of Cold Fusion Research

ICCF-21 Poster 9 180530

Documentation of Dr. Edmund Storms’ 29 Years of CF Research: Lessons Learned for Long-Term LENR Researchers by Thomas Grimshaw University of Texas at Austin and Edmund Storms Kiva Labs
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Dr. Edmund Storms was one of the first researchers to follow up on the cold fusion claims of Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons in March 1989. He has continued his cold fusion (now widely referred to as low-energy nuclear reactions, LENR) research in the years since, first in his position at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and then in his home laboratory in Santa Fe, New Mexico. His work has included both laboratory experiments and development of explanations of the LENR phenomenon.

During his 29 years of investigations, he has developed one of the most extensive LENR research records in existence. Much of this work is available in the public realm through his publication of papers and presentations at conferences. There is in addition an extensive body of research results that are in his private files. A project, termed the “Storms LENR Research Documentation Project”, has been undertaken to compile the publicly available documents and to capture, organize, store, and document the private records.

Dr. Storms had enjoyed a 35-year career at LANL, primarily in advanced materials research, when LENR was announced. His pre-LENR investigations were mostly in refractory materials, such as the carbides and nitrides, for hightemperature nuclear energy applications (nuclear rocket, nuclear power source for space). This highly relevant foundation enabled him to quickly become established as a premier investigator in the LENR field. He has conducted many types of LENR experiments, utilizing most of the methods for achieving the effect, including the Fleishman-Pons approach (electrolytic cells) and the gas discharge and gas loading methods. He has also designed and constructed many kinds of calorimeters for measuring excess heat.

As a consequence of his many years of LENR research, Dr. Storms has developed a large body of experimental data along with many publications and unpublished reports. The records collected for the Project have been organized into Components based primarily on the source of information: publications, unpublished progress reports, work history (lab notebook entries), electronic files, hard-copy materials, LENR library holdings, interviews of Dr. Storms, and ICCF conferences.

The principal objectives of the LENR Research Documentation Project are to secure and archive the public and private collection of hard-copy and electronic LENR files and to make the materials more accessible for Dr. Storms and others who are interested in the LENR field to conduct more enhanced review for additional insights. The Project scope is from March 1989 through December 2015. It began in August 2015, when Dr. Grimshaw made his first onsite visit. Eleven more trips were made to collect information, interview Dr. Storms, and prepare documents.

An incremental approach was used to collect information because the full scope of the research materials was not known in advance. The first steps were to prepare memos describing each element as it was found. More than 80 memos were prepared. The Project was conducted in three stages. Reports were prepared for each stage. The Stage 1 report documented the information obtained. The Stage 2 objective was to organize the Stage 1 information. The organization was accomplished by developing timelines for each Component. The Stage 3 (Final) report includes appendices with timelines for each Component. Annexes
with the publications and progress reports, Dr. Storms’ interviews, and copies of the memos prepared for the Project were also included.

There are a number of opportunities for additional development and analysis of Dr. Storms’ LENR research record. Almost all of the Project Components could be documented in greater detail, and the associated timelines could be further refined, leading to a more complete
Integrated Timeline. In particular, the relationship among the Components could be further analyzed and a more complete picture developed for the research and results. Since the cutoff date for the Project is December 31, 2015, the effort could also be extended for 2016 to 2018. Technical analysis and interpretation could be another fruitful area for further development. Dr. Storms is currently conducting additional review and analysis for new insights or discoveries. A permanent location for the hard-copy and electronic records
will be advisable, such as a repository at a qualified and interested university.

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HYDROTON A Model of Cold Fusion

Ruby Carat and the Cold Fusion Now! collective have released a new video documentary, this time tackling cold fusion theory with Edmund Storms HYDROTON A Model of Cold Fusion.

The 28-minute science special continues where the book The Explanation of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction left off. It features Dr. Edmund Storms describing his theory of the cold fusion/LENR reaction that focuses on the unusual form of hydrogen that can form in the nano-spaces of materials.

Nano-cracks in materials will have a high negative-charge along the walls of the space, allowing positively-charged hydrogen nuclei to be closer than they normally could.

Subject to resonance, the hypothesis proposes a linear array of hydrogen nuclei and electrons in the nano-crack that can engage in a “slow fusion” process, whereby the smaller bits of mass turn to energy by releasing coherent photons.

If true, the mechanism would be an extension of conventional nuclear models which only describes fusion in a hot plasma, where nuclei collide violently to fuse.

The action is animated by artist Jasen Chambers who modeled all the isotopes of hydrogen in the unique LENR process.

Ruby Carat has had multiple interviews with Dr. Storms since 2011, most recently in the offices of Cold Fusion Now! in Eureka, California, US. That video composite describes the Nano-gap Hydroton Model and its development.

Hypotheses of the Nano-gap Hydroton model are currently being tested for confirmation.

See Edmund Storms HYDROTON A Model of Cold Fusion on the Cold Fusion Now! Youtube page here https://youtu.be/D4BPtwzsgiw

Get Edmund Storms’ book The Explanation of Low Energy Nuclear Reaction: An Examination of the Relationship between Observation and Explanation from his website http://www.lenrexplained.com

Dr. Edmund Storms website http://www.lenrexplained.com

Edmund Storms HYDROTON A Model of Cold Fusion

HYDROTON animation by Jasen Chambers http://jasenlux.com

Title animation by Augustus Clark and Mike Harris http://augustusclark.com

Music by Esa Ruoho a.k.a. lackluster https://lackluster.bandcamp.com

ICCF-18 video by Eli Elliott http://www.elienation.com

Filmed, edited and narrated by Ruby Carat https://twitter.com/ColdFusionNow

Our work supports Cold Fusion Now! and Eugene Mallove’s Infinite Energy Foundation. We hope you will too.

http://www.coldfusionnow.org

http://infinite-energy.com

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Q&A on the NAE

Peter Gluck of Ego-out engages Edmund Storms on the NAE
http://egooutpeters.blogspot.ro/2017/01/jan-23-2017-lenr-info-questions.html

Question If NAE are nanocracks – why is there a limit for their number/density? What is the limiting factor?

Answer The cracks are generated by stress generated by the change in volume when D reacts with Pd. The cracks form at weak regions in the structure. A limit to the number of weak regions exists in a structure. Once crack formation has relieved the stress, no further cracks can form. This is basic material behavior having nothing unusual about the process until the Hydroton forms. For reasons yet unknown, once the critical size crack forms, it can then support the LENR process.

Question Are those active cracks special in some way or is it only a problem of size?

Answer The gap size is the critical condition. A size too large can not support LENR.

Question If temperature is a factor, how?

Answer Temperature determines how fast D can get to the NAE by diffusion from its site in the surrounding lattice.

Question Will the processes at 70, 400, 800, 12000 C be qualitatively the same, or will be some changes in the mechanism?

Answer The mechanism is not changed by temperature. Temperature ONLY changes how fast the fuel (D or H) can get to where it can fuse.

Question How and why do the NAE resist and survive the nuclear process?

Answer The gap is filled with a chemical structure consisting of chains of D. These chains (Hydrotons) fuse by an unknown process and are destroyed. The gap remains in which more Hydroton can form. The gap can remain because the energy is released slowly without causing destruction of the local lattice structure. As I have been saying, one unique and required feature of LENR is the slow rate at which energy is released. Of course, this process is only slow when compared to the hot fusion process. Cold fusion is actually better described as slow fusion.

Question Piantelli said he had excess heat for months. The Rossi heat effect seems to be OK for 6 months. Why is the duration of the PdD excess heat a problem?

Answer Many people have seen the process last for a long time. In my case, it stops only when I cause it to stop because want to go on to other studies.

Question What do you think and which factors play a role for the claimed greater density of NAE in NiH then in PdD – metallurgy, morphology? Perhaps we have to consider that Pd D works with deuterium and NiH with protium.

Answer Ni does not take up as much hydrogen isotope as Pd, hence the stress is less compared to Pd. Also, Ni is stronger than Pd, thereby preventing the stress from producing much cracking. Rossi found a way to produce the active cracks in Ni powder where each grain could contain a number of active cracks. Arata was able to activate Pd powder with impressive power production. Clearly, powder allows more NAE to form within the same weight of material. Work in Japan is taking advantage of this conclusion using Pd.

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An Examination of the Relationship Between Observation and Explanation